Chair Yoga for Back Pain

Chair Yoga for Back PainIf you are like me, you experience occasional to chronic back tension or pain. If you want to feel better, you need to move better. The most important place for you to move your body is the very place you spend the most amount of time… your chair. If you sit to make a living… you need to move from that very seat you’re on now. And not just a little… you need to do it often… throughout the day… the more the better… Chair Yoga for Back Pain.

A big goal of mine is to teach you how to integrate 60-120 minutes of cumulative movement… performed in multiples of 30 seconds, 1-5 minute increments, and a 20-30 minute movement sessions… every day, including your preferred sports, activities, and hobbies.

This may sound like a lot, but It is totally doable. The good thing is that the movements you need to do don’t take much time or effort.  And the best part is that they provide an amazing payoff.  As long as you do them Pain-Free, I’m certain that you will feel much better physically and mentally. Your work productivity will improve. You’ll feel increased energy, reduce pain and injury; and so much more.

Monday Movement Flow of the Week

Below is a three-part video series of super sweet chair movements. When combined, they make for a healthier spine; ease back tension and pain; as well as provide an overall enormous bang for your movement buck. If you’re not already practicing full three-dimensional spinal movement, then I suggest starting here.

I will be practicing these movements with you. I will post my daily flow on Instagram and Facebook. These movements are important for your body. In my videos and descriptions, you will see a few of the great feeling variations of movement you can add to this very simple flow.

My challenge to you is… Do these movements, NON-PAINFULLY, every day, at least once/sitting day – up to once for every 1-2 hours that you sit. Keep the repetitions low 3-5 reps per movement. Once you have the movements down, it should only take 1-3 minutes to go through this flow. I’m more concerned with frequency throughout the day than massive reps at any one point during the day.

Begin the movement exploration easy and reach a little further with each extension, so that your last is the longest. REMINDER: Pain-Free! Try it out for a week and let me know how your body feels.

Chair Yoga for Back Pain

No Pain:
In each of these movements. If you feel pain. Stop first!!! Tell me second. Send me a message or leave a comment and tell me what you’re feeling. I can’t promise to have the solution, but I may be able to point you in a helpful direction. I will be addressing pain in some upcoming posts… If you don’t want to miss them… subscribe to my blog on my website (on the annoying pop-up window to the bottom right corner).

Seated Cat/Cow

Breathing:
Early on, I like to focus my exhale with spinal flexion of the cat… and inhale with the extension of the cow. Paying attention to the fullness of my breath. Can I fill my chest? Ribs? Belly? And pelvic floor? Do I feel tension or resistance? I breathe into it softly until the tension opens and releases into a fuller breathe… then I reverse my breath… and feel for more tension.

I love this movement because I can feel the full segmental flexion and extension of my spine. And when I can’t because of back tension or pain… my body knows the movements… and these movements can help release the tension… reducing the pain.

This can be done with head held in extension or allowing full flexion similar to traditional quadrupedal cat/cows. I also like to add in head and neck mobility in both positions.

 

Seated Side Body Lengthening
2 of 3 Chair Yoga videos

Breathing:
Pay attention to the fullness of your breath. Can you fill your chest? Ribs? Belly? And pelvic floor? Do you feel tension or resistance? Breathe into it softly until the tension opens and releases into a fuller breathe… Next… reverse your breath… and feel for more tension.

I love this movement for how it lengthens my spine in lateral extension without moving the opposite side into lateral flexion… and I can feel it from my fingertips, throughout my arm and shoulder, through my low back side body, into hips, down to the knee. This is a position of length that our bodies rarely experience… and desperately need.

Seated Rotation

Breathing:
Same as above.

I love this movement for its focus on the relationship between the thoracic spine to hips. I can feel spine move segment by segment… I can sense which joints are allowing movement and which are holding it down. Once I find a good spot… I will softly move in and out of it… encouraging length… without forcing it. It should feel like a soft stretch… not massive.

Did you found these videos helpful? Please check out my Patreon page to learn how you can help support this work.

Please pardon the editing. With your help, I am working on hiring a content manager 😊

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A Day of Playing – Checking in to Move Well

No school, no clients, no kid…

It’s a totally free and clear day. What am I going to do??? I am spending the day playing at Austin Boulding Project… checking in, writing, shooting videos, climbing, experiments with Instagram stories, and whatever else catches my fancy.

I’m extra excited… I replaced my 15-year-old climbing shoes which were falling apart with these @sportiva.climbing shoes.

Checking in - New shoes

 

When your day is devoted to playing… Where do you begin?

I begin by checking in.

I woke up with some minor aches at the medial right knee with walking and general right side low back tension/tightness/restriction. Considering the swelling in my knee from last week and an active day yesterday with mountain biking… I pretty much expected this. Nothing feels more inflamed or painful than usual… but I do want to check in with my body before pushing myself.

At austinboulderingproject, they have a nice fitness room setup with a floor movement section and massage tools. I love using the foam roller as a part of checking in with where I am holding tension in my body. Things I noticed during this 10-minute foam roller session… Right side calf tension and right side low back. I give an extra bit of love to these areas… not for release… not to fix anything… but more to just bring blood flow and attention to how I’m moving through these areas of my body. This section of the video is only sped up by 2 to show how slow and soft I am on the foam roller.

Also, considering I will probably be climbing a fair amount, I make sure to roll out my forearms… just enough to bring blood flow.

Checking in continued… hip to spine mobility

After foam rolling, I am checking in with full body joint by joint mobility. This is an exploration of how all the pieces are playing with the whole.

I generally begin with my hips… moving through shin box to pigeon. I am noticing the tightness of my right nip in external rotation and its relationship to the right low back tension/tightness/restrictions… and play with this a bit… feeling… can these two individual parts connect… can they play well together. It is an easing and opening into movement.

This video is only sped up 2x… I’m hoping the slowness of the movement can be seen.

Checking in Continued… fingers, wrists, and forearms

Since I’m just getting back into climbing after a long layoff and I have a history of shoulder and elbow issues (seven months of elbow tendonitis last year), my fingers and forearms are a huge weak link. I want to develop a healthy climbing practice that will last me the rest of my life…

This is simple joint mobility work for the fingers, wrists, and forearms. Again, I’m checking in to make sure everything works. After climbing last week, I’ve noticed some minor joint compression in my right third and fourth fingers at the DIP and PIP joints. It’s not enough to cause worry… but enough to let me know these areas need my attention.

This video is sped up by 2.

Checking in Continued… Spine

How do I find the movements of gait when my gait exhibits dysfunction?

My low back is sore… tight… achy… especially the right side low back. This is the norm. Since the most recent knee surgery, I don’t express my gait pattern fully through my left knee. This means I also don’t express my gait pattern fully through the right side lumbar and thoracic spine (as well as other places). This means my gait is a dysfunctional movement pattern.

These are some of my core work for segmental three-dimensional movements through my spine. This is what keeps me active. When I don’t do this… I hurt… I hurt bad. I used to have such bad back pain that I would be laid up for weeks from a single episode. These types of movements… every day… keeps the pain away from the 7’s, 8’s, 9’s, and 10’s out of ten… and more around 1’s, 2’s, and 3’s.

This video is sped up 6x. I am moving slowly… feeling each segment of my spine moving in all three planes of motion.

Checking in continued… toes, ankles, knees, hips, shoulder, and spine…

Checking in… feeling into my structure… taking the toes, ankles, knees and hips, shoulders, and spine joints through some loading patterns… checking in to feeling… is there pain? Stiffness? Restriction?

I noticed the left knee to foot feels a bit disconnected in the squat variations and in the tripod with rotation when loaded on the right shoulder … something I will keep focus on throughout the day.

My body feels much improved from the stiffness and achiness of this morning. I’m still noticing a little knee tenderness… I don’t want to aggravate this… so I’ll continue to check in with it throughout the day.
Now… it’s time to climb

One more before I go climb. I’ve been sitting writing up my movement series for a while.

Just because I am sitting… doesn’t mean I’m not moving. Even as I sit… I express movement… feeling my back, neck, breathing, shoulders… stagnation is a sign of death. I am alive… and movement is my expression of life.

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Neck Pain Self Care Using Thera-cane

In this video, I demonstrate how to use self-massage to work out tightness/restriction in the neck using a combination of movement assessment and a Thera-cane.

In the short time since making the video, my neck has improved. There was still a niggle of tightness at the base of the right side occipitals that I missed while filming. Probably due to being a bit rushed. I have since used the Thera-cane on that spot and my neck feels much improved.

I hope you find this video helpful. Below is a link for the Thera-cane. Please leave a comment if you have a question about this video or suggestions for a future demonstration.

Link to Thera-Cane on AmazonNeck Pain Self Care Using Thera-cane

This is an Amazon affiliate link. I am sharing for two reasons 1) because I love the product and 2) If you make a purchase after clicking it, I will get a commission. This is a great way to help support The Art of Fitness. Thank you for your support.

Neck Discomfort Self Care Using Thera-cane

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Developing a Movement Practice Group Class

I am offering a new group class, Developing a Movement Practice. This will be a one-off experimental class focusing on exploring who are you as a human mover; developing the beautiful expression of your movement practice; and how to embrace play to prevent and reverse early onset boring adult disease.

This class will be based off what I do in my one-on-one sessions, except in a small group format. Which means it won’t look anything like what I do in one-on-one sessions. To be perfectly honest, I don’t know what this class will ultimately look like. It will be a total interactive experiment. My primary goal is that you leave with a better understanding of your body, human movement, and the art of developing a movement practice.

Because this class is an experiment and I love the concept of Gift Economy, I am offering this class as a gift. I will not charge anyone who attends *(I will only charge if you sign up and no show). I have no expectation of any payment, donation or otherwise. **If you find value from the class that you feel strongly enough to gift back, I will happily accept your gift.

Cancellation or No Show

*This will be a small intimate group. I’m only opening it to four people. Please do not sign up unless you are committed to showing up ready to learn, participate, explore, and play. In the event that you do sign up, cancel within 72 hours, or no show, you will be charged $100. This policy will be strictly enforced.

Gifting

**If you wish to give back but don’t know how much, my perceived value of this class is between 0-$100 per person.

Location:

Birdsong Bodywork & Pilates
http://www.birdsongbodywork.com/
2927 West Anderson Lane
Austin, TX 78757

You can sign up for Developing a Movement Practice Group Class here.

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Summer Hours and Upcoming Presentations

Summer Hours and Upcoming Presentations

New Summer Hours!

My first semester back to school is in the books, and I’m happy to report that I received all A’s for my effort! No rest for the wary, though! Last week, I started summer classes at Texas State University–Developmental Psychology and Medical Terminology. Summer school classes are daily and intensive, which means some major changes to the availability of Massage Therapy and Coaching sessions. To make up for the lack of morning appointments, I have opened up some new summer hours. You can view my current schedule here

Summer is a great opportunity to show your body a little extra love! Schedule yourself a massage here.

Upcoming Presentations!

Over the summer, I’m excited to be presenting at Oak Hill Wellness. Mark your calendars now, come check out the center, and learn some immediate ways to improve your movement and your life!

July 27, 2017: Movement Restoration

Movement Restoration - Summer Hours and Upcoming PresentationsWhat are the steps to leading a pain-free life? Believe it or not, they don’t include lying around waiting for the pain to end. There’s no pill, magic formula, injection, or surgery that can take the place of healthy movement. Pain often stems from immobility or lack of movement. I find that most cases of chronic pain can be solved by learning how to move the body and developing a daily intentional movement practice. In this workshop, I’ll be sharing some easy-to-implement, daily exercises for restoring lost movement patterns to reduce pain and improve your life. Bring a mat if you have one, and be sure to wear clothes you can move in.

August 24, 2017: Finding Balance

Finding Balance - Summer Hours and Upcoming PresentationsContrary to popular opinion, balance is not about maintaining a static position, such as standing on one leg for a long period of time. To feel steady on your feet and avoid falling well into advanced age, you must develop dynamic balancing skills. After a fall, our tendency is to go into a state of fear, caving into ourselves, becoming rigid, and afraid to move. This state actually increases the likelihood of another fall. Instead of moving in fear, you need to challenge your balance in order to re-calibrate your nervous system. Join us for a workshop that will improve your overall balance, reduce falling, and even provide strategies for a safer fall! Bring a mat if you have one, and be sure to wear clothes you can move in.

To learn more check out the Oak Hill Wellness Clinic team.

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Movement Restoration to Avoid Overuse Injuries

Movement Restoration to Avoid Overuse Injuries

Recently, I received this question on the Art of Fitness Facebook page. This is part two to my response. You can read part one here. Here is the original question.

I run. I run for a lot of reasons. I know that physically speaking, it can/will wear on your body like any repetitive movement. So, if, you’re like me, and are unwilling to give up regular runs, what is the joint-saving balance? I have a regular yoga practice (equally important) but is there something else I should be doing? I run 20-30 miles a week (3-4, 6-8 mile runs); yoga twice a week; Pilates once a week; and if I make my way into an actual gym, I swing kettlebells, pick up heavy things, and wonder around pretending I know what I’m doing. Any suggestions?

I would like to throw a wrench into the popular belief that pain and injury are due to overuse. Chronic pain and injury isn’t caused by the movements we do too much—chronic pain and injury are most often due to the movements we don’t or can’t do enough. While issues of overuse do certainly happen, pain and injury is actually a problem of the underutilization of very specific natural human movements.

Sitting causes pain - movement restorationWe sit in our cars, desks, and couches. We don’t squat to work, climb, crawl or otherwise use our bodies the way they were designed to move. Engaging in these natural human movements provide movement balance. If you aren’t moving in these other ways, your body will adapt and compensate to the ways you do move. This creates the secondary problem of overuse. Overuse is a symptom, not the problem.  

This may seem like a subtle distinction, but I believe it is important because it changes our focus regarding how we choose to correct movement imbalances. When addressing an “overuse” injury, the traditional corrective is to stop doing the specific movement that aggravates pain, but what do we replace that movement with? While you may find temporary relief, once you begin running again you’ll be back to “overusing” those muscles.

Most often if there are any corrective exercises even prescribed (and this is a big if), they tend to be specific to the site of pain—for example, if you have elbow pain, you’re given exercises to strengthen the elbow and possibly shoulder; knee pain leads to exercises for the knee and hip, etc. The problem with this is that the injury isn’t only to the site of pain… it is to your entire body. To treat the site of pain without addressing how that part integrates with the whole is incomplete. This is the primary reason I receive so many referrals from clients after seeing multiple physical therapists without resolution to their pain.

Don’t Treat Pain. Treat movement!

No Pain - Movement RestorationSomething I tell clients during the initial consultation is, “I don’t treat pain. I treat movement.” It is out of my scope of practice to treat your pain, plus I believe that attempting to do so will render less beneficial results. Instead, I look at how you move, and more importantly, how you don’t move. My focus is on bringing back all the movements you’ve lost in order to bring balance back to the entire movement system. My assumption is that if you move well, with balance throughout the spectrum of human movement, you will probably experience less pain. I call this Movement Restoration.

Restoring Movement Will Decrease Injury

Movement restoration is the exploration, re-establishing, rewiring, remapping, and reconfiguring of your natural human movement—moving the way you were designed to move. Through Movement Restoration, we find what is lost and work to bring those movements back into your abilities: can you lift your arms over your head, squat down to the floor, unstrap your bra, get up off the floor without using your hands, crawl, and climb? And can you do these things without pain? Can you do them well? With mastery?

A Movement Restoration Practice

But how, you might be wondering. What does this even look like?

1. Focus on the micro movements.
In the larger fitness industry, there is a focus on big, sexy, intense movements. Swinging tons of weight around and pushing our body hard feels good, but if you don’t move well at the micro, foundational levels, you’re going to break your body down over time. To move well, you have to focus on the small movements first.

  • How does each joint move through its full range of motion in relationship to the joints above and below it? How does each vertebrae move in three dimensions: pitching forwards and backwards, side to side, or rotationally? Consider this like a systems check, a movement inspection.
  • If you move well in one area of your body, in one specific direction, but poorly in the opposite direction, you’ve found an imbalance. That imbalance is showing up in your movement with every step you take and it is contributing to your potential pain and injury.

2. Move all day, throughout the day.
Movement should not be relegated to a 30-60 minute class, run, or workout. We are human movers. We are not supposed to be sedentary beings. We are supposed to move constantly. Restoration movements are so low in intensity that you can’t do too much. Really, you can’t do enough! These are the movements you need to be doing all day, every day, throughout the day. Incorporating them into your home, work, and recreational routines. So how do you move constantly throughout the day?

  • Move from where you are at. If you spend time in a chair all day, then you need to incorporate movement breaks into your work… in your chair!
  • Movement is nutrition. How you move is how you feed your body movement. If you sit all day without moving, it’s the equivalent of feeding your body McDonalds. I teach my clients “movement snacks” which are specific movement tools they can use throughout the day. Here’s a video of my level one movement restoration

  • Here are some simple movements you can perform from your office chair.

Building on the Movement Restoration Foundation

As we move from the micro level to the macro level movements, we begin to focus on developing specific skills. Skill builds upon movement restoration into practical function and purpose.

For example, Shin Box, a restoration movement, moves your hips from internal to external rotation. In skill, we look at going from shinbox to standing, shinbox to knees, knees to standing. This gives you the skill of getting up and down from the floor without bracing with your hands. Cat Cow, the restorative movement, helps you develop flexion in your lower back and spine, which is the foundation for many different skills which use this flexion–lifting, walking, squatting, etc. Movement restoration asks, does the joint work? Can I move in these patterns? Skill asks, can I accomplish this task: Squatting down to pick up a child, getting up from the floor, etc.

I will discuss skill in greater detail in part three.

Want to learn more about how Movement Therapy can help you? We offer in person coaching and online coaching.

Click here to schedule a free consultation.

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How to Avoid Running Injuries? Move Better

How to Avoid Running Injuries? Move Better

How to avoid running injuries? Recently I received this question on the Art of Fitness Facebook page:

How to avoid running injuriesI run. I run for a lot of reasons. I know that physically speaking, it can/will wear on your body like any repetitive movement. So, if, you’re like me, and are unwilling to give up regular runs, what is the joint-saving balance? I have a regular yoga practice (equally important) but is there something else I should be doing? I run 20-30 miles a week (3-4, 6-8 mile runs); yoga twice a week; Pilates once a week; and if I make my way into an actual gym, I swing kettlebells, pick up heavy things, and wander around pretending I know what I’m doing. Any suggestions to avoid running injuries?

Since this is a question I hear often, I decided to share my thoughts here on the blog as well.

How to Avoid Running Injuries?

First, I don’t believe that running will wear down your joints. Running is a natural human movement. If done well, I believe we should be able to run well into old age. Our body should not break down until after we die. I believe that our joints wear down early simply because we don’t move the way our human bodies were designed to move. We move unnaturally and this causes us to run and move poorly.  The problem isn’t that running is bad. It’s that we don’t move well; and if we don’t move well, we won’t run well either. Just as if you drive your car poorly, it will break down faster.

So with that said, I think your question on finding balance is a very good one. In response, I’ll pose another question and answer.

How do you become a very good human mover so that you can become a very good human runner?

To become a very good mover, you must first focus on exploring and restoring all that is lost in your natural human movement.

Crawling to avoid running injuriesRunning as Part of a Bigger Picture

Humans are movers. We run, balance, jump, crawl, climb, manipulate objects, and so much more. It is a part of our design. Movement, at its essence, is intricately tied to our evolutionary prowess. We were not designed to be still, stagnant, rigid, or immobile. But through our technological advancements, we have created an environment in which we go through our day and hardly move at all!

To avoid running injuries and become a better runner, you may need to change the focus away from running and look at your bigger movement picture. Essentially, if you want to become a good runner, become a skillful mover (i.e. running, balancing, jumping, crawling, climbing, lifting & carrying, throwing & catching, and most importantly playing). This is where modalities such as MovNat can be incredibly beneficial, which imagesis why I am a MovNat coach.

A New Movement Paradigm

It is tempting to choose exercises that focus on conditioning, to work on running further and faster or simply as an outlet to release the stress of life. This is what feels good, and it’s how we’ve been taught we’re supposed to exercise–that more is better, harder is better, no pain no gain, etc.  However, this is a mistake that leads to injury.

By being hyper focused on aggressive conditioning, you’re teaching your body to move in small specific patterns over and over again at the expense of larger less specific movement patterns. This develops overuse of certain muscles and joints and underuse of others, leading to the imbalances you’ve mentioned in your question. Our bodies adapt specifically to the movements that we feed them. So if we are constantly moving in one way–sitting in front of the computer, for example–then our bodies adapt. We develop rounded shoulders and forward head posture and neck pain and back pain comes with it. When we don’t move in counter directions, we eventually lose the ability to move in counter directions. In other words, when movements are under-utilized, they eventually become unavailable to us. If you don’t use it, you literally lose it. This is the injury to your body, well before any pain sets in.

More Patterns Of Movement

How to avoid running injuriesWhile it feels like a drastic departure to our sedentary existence, running is a movement pattern that actually mimics sitting (lots of hip flexion with a forward head posture). If you’re sitting all day in front of a computer, then you go out running, and that’s your only source of consciously practiced movement, then you are unwittingly reinforcing the same movement pattern that you’ve been in all day. If you want to find balance, strength, posture, ability, then you have to explore the movement patterns that counter your current movements. You must restore the movements that you’re not already doing.

Yoga can be a very good restorative movement practice. Much of what I teach if very Yoga-ish. However, the benefits from Yoga will depend upon the teacher, the practice, the student, and ultimately by itself is incomplete. Also, I see quite a few Yoga related injuries in my practice and I speak about that here.

Move better to avoid running injuriesMovement Restoration

This is where I begin with every new client, restoring movement.

Movement restoration is the exploration, re-establishing, rewiring, remapping, and reconfiguring of holistic movement. Through Movement Restoration, we find what is lost and work to bring them back into your movement abilities: can you lift your arms over your head, squat down to the floor, unstrap your bra, get up off the floor without using your hands, crawl, and climb. And can you do these things without pain? Can you do them well? With mastery?

This is our single minded focus for the first phase of developing a new movement practice. Here is a glimpse of the beginning movement restoration exercises. I will go a little deeper into what Movement Restoration means in my next update.

Want to learn more about how Movement Therapy can help you? We offer in person coaching and online coaching.

 

Click here to schedule a free consultation.

 

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How to Recover from an Injury: Hint…Don’t Try it Without a Movement Therapist (Part 2)

 

Is there an optimal way to heal and recover from injury? The short answer is YES. But what does that look like? Here is a great example in Part Two of How to Recover from an Injury by Heidi Armstrong of Injured Athlete’s Toolbox.

 

How to Recover from an Injury: Hint…Don’t Try it Without a Movement Therapist (Part 2)

Guest blog by Heidi Armstrong of The Injured Athlete’s Toolbox

How to Recover from an injury

This is the second in a 4-part series where I’ll share why, after injury, working with a Movement Therapist is a must. You can read part 1 here.

I’ll share what prompted me to see Jesse, what happens to your nervous system after an injury, and how Movement Therapy helps. I’ll also share how Jesse is helping me unlearn 5 years of constrained (or unnatural) movement.

No, Jesse isn’t paying me to write this. That’s not my style or his. My hope is that my experience will motivate you to recapture the movements that injury has greedily taken.


If you haven’t read part 1 of this series, read that first, then come back.

After years of injury recovery I knew I wasn’t moving with my former fluidity or balance. I just didn’t realize the depth of my brain’s dysfunctional rut until I saw Jesse. Since even minor injuries result in altered movement, I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised to discover how much of my normal mobility I had lost.

Normally, muscles are supposed to react and respond to movement, but when we’re injured, the body cannot get into the right space (because it’s lacking range of motion) for muscles to work properly. The result: we feel tightness followed by pain.

Despite lots of daily stretching, I felt my body getting more and more restricted on the side opposite of my injury, specifically my hip and back. I learned why from Jesse. Note: It’s very common for second injuries to happen on a part of the body diagonal from the first injury.

Jesse said, “Traditional static stretching isn’t great for movement restoration because it doesn’t challenge the nervous system in gravity. Static stretching has its place, but I consider it like salting your food. A little goes a long way.”

Click here to read more…

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Week One Injury Update

medial-meniscus-over-compensation-pain Injury UpdateIt’s been a little over a week since I heard the big “pop” in my knee and damaged my meniscus. Here is my week one injury update.

I am in the process of getting an appointment with the orthopedic doctor. I had x-rays last Friday. You can’t see meniscus damage in an x-ray, but the Ortho docs won’t even see you until you’ve had them done. All they could see was swelling in the knee. I’m not in a huge hurry to see the docs. I’m more curious as to what type of tear I have. I won’t even consider surgery for 6-12 months, so if it takes a few weeks to get an appointment, I’m good with that.

I am grateful for the work I do for a living and to have the knowledge about physical therapy that I have. I know the protocol well. I have been actively engaged in keeping my body moving as well as possible over the past week beginning the day of the injury. The big challenge is to focus on exploring what I “can do” not the “can’t do’s”

Pain has been significant and pretty consistent. Some days worse than others. Yesterday was a good day. Today has been rough. It doesn’t so much hurt to move. It hurts more when I don’t move. Sitting is the worst. Up and down hills and stairs are tough because of pain. Hand foot crawls are impossible at the moment. I’m starting to get some compensation discomfort in my left calf and right side low back.

Week One Knee Injury Update:The Can Do’s:

Even though pain has been significant, I’ve seen some substantial improvement in knee function.
-I have 95+% range of motion of the knee, which bodes well for recovery. I can do a full deep assisted squat without pain. The primary range I don’t have is foot loaded tibial rotation.
-I’ve quickly gone from 10 minutes on the stationary bike at level 0 to 4 sets of 10 minutes at level 3. Hoping to get on a real bike in a week or so.
-I can now transition side to side shin box without my hands on the floor without pain. It took 4-5 days to get that function back.
-I can swim. Kicking feels good, although pushing off the wall can be painful. So I have to go super slow. It feels good to have some kind of movement I can focus on.
-climbing and floor work. Push-ups, pull ups, parallette bar work. Upper body is going to be beast by the end of this.

Emotionally:

This is the toughest part of a big injury. Toughest to feel and definitely toughest to express. I find myself putting on the straight face with most people, including myself. But the reality is that I feel this injury even more emotionally than I do physically.

It sucks. Movement is a big part of my life. Feeling capable is where I feel strong. The first few days I was constantly seeing all the things I could not do. They started adding up. Emotionally, I was feeling hurt, sadness, uncertainty, and fear. Over the past few days, it’s been anger. I’m basically a big ball of swirling emotions.

This is the hardest part of getting injured. The last thing I want to do is to push these emotions down. I don’t want to suppress. I don’t want to hold onto it. I am willing to feel, even if feeling sometimes feels uncomfortable.

At the same time, I don’t want these feelings to rule my thoughts and choices. It’s easy to spin into a deep dark place and give up. Giving up will not help me heal. Giving up will not teach me about myself. Giving up will not put me in a better place on the other side of this injury. Giving up is not an option. Surrendering to the fact that I am an emotional human being going through a challenging experience; and allowing myself to be ok, is the only choice I see. I will cry when I feel tears come up and I will continue to step, or at times limp, forward.

I am grateful for this opportunity to learn something about myself. I look forward to the person I meet on the other side.

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Injury! Setback or Opportunity

Injury! A setback or an opportunity?

It’s a very simple yet profound choice. Do you see an injury as a setback? Or can you find the opportunity it brings you? Which one you choose will play a major role in the type of progress you make during your recovery. I now get to make this choice once again for myself.

meniscus tear type - Injury setback opportunityA couple days ago, on Wednesday August 3rd,  I felt a pop in my knee (my good knee) standing out of a deep pistol squat position. This is a movement I’ve performed countless times. I was showing a client what a pistol squat was, but my body was not prepared properly to make it. All signs turn towards a torn meniscus. A significant injury.

Yes, it will be a setback to my workout program. It will probably take at least a year to recover from without surgery and even longer if I opt for surgery.

Is this Injury a Setback or Opportunity?

No! It is an opportunity. I get to learn something new about myself; about my body; and about injury, healing, and recovery.

I am reeling a bit emotionally. There is a level in which an injury just sucks. I’m sure I’ll get to explore the depths of emotions such as anger, disappointment, self judgement, and depression over the next few weeks and months. There is always a strong emotional component to injury. Which is why my choice of outlook is so important.

I am willing to feel the emotional rollercoaster that is coming because even in the depths of it, I will learn and grow.

Injury sucks, my movement progress will be setback, but I am grateful for the opportunity to learn about myself. I’ll keep you updated on my progress.

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